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Thursday, August 6, 2020 | History

1 edition of Animal damage management in Pacific Northwest forests found in the catalog.

Animal damage management in Pacific Northwest forests

Animal damage management in Pacific Northwest forests

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  • 20 Currently reading

Published by s.n.] in [Pullman, Wash.? .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Forest protection -- Northwest, Pacific -- Congresses.,
  • Wildlife management -- Northwest, Pacific -- Congresses.,
  • Trees -- Wounds and injuries -- Congresses.

  • Edition Notes

    Statement[sponsored by] Cooperative Extension, Washington State University ... [et al.].
    ContributionsEvans, James, 1930-, Washington State University. Cooperative Extension.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination[v], 164 p.
    Number of Pages164
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL15289349M

    Taylor, Jimmy D. II, "Wildlife in managed forests: An overview of perspectives from the Pacific Northwest" (). USDA National Wildlife Research Center - Staff Publications. Highline Community College campus in Des Moines has a Washington native plant habitat garden. Divided into four regions, eastern Wash, coastal, NW forest, and subalpine, they have about representative species. South th Street & Pacific Highway South, Des Moines, WA ; Kruckeberg Botanic Garden.

    The meadow vole is an important food source for many predators, and disperses mycorrhizal fungi. It is a major consumer of grass and disperses grass nutrients in its feces. After disruptive site disturbances such as forest or meadow fires, the meadow vole's activities contribute to habitat : Cricetidae. on BMPs for maintaining soil productivity in the Douglas--r region. ffe workshop was held Sept. 22, , in Shelton, Wash., and was sponsored by the Northwest Forest Soils Council and Western Forestry and Conservation Association. ffis publication presents key concepts that form the basis for developing and selecting site-speci-cFile Size: 4MB.

    The stubble habitat created by the old growth forest provides benefits for species not directly dependent on the habitant itself (Wilcove ). For example, the decline of many salmon species shown has been linked, in part, with logging in the Pacific Northwest of the United States and the subsequent in water quality. Snowshoe hares are primarily found in boreal forests and upper montane forests; within these forests, they favor habitats with a dense shrub layer.. In the Pacific Northwest, snowshoe hares occupy diverse habitats, including mature conifers (mostly Douglas-fir [Pseudotsuga menziesii] and variants), immature conifers, alder (Alnus spp.)/salmonberry (Rubus spectabilis), Sitka Class: Mammalia.


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Animal damage management in Pacific Northwest forests Download PDF EPUB FB2

Silvicultural approaches to animal damage management in Pacific Northwest forests [Hugh C. Black] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Silvicultural approaches to animal damage management in Pacific Northwest forestsManufacturer: U.S. Dept.

of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station. This book examines the potential of Silvicultural approaches for managing animal damage in forests at two levels: management of free-to-grow stands and sitespecific practices that foster prompt and successful by: Silvicultural Approaches to Animal Damage Management in Pacific Northwest Forests [Hugh C.

Black] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Animal damage management in Pacific Northwest forests --Animal damage management in the context of integrated forest protection --Principles of plant and animal ecology --General principles of forest vegetation management --Introduction to forest wildlife ecology --Silvicultural practices and influence on animal damage --Silvicultural systems.

Additional Physical Format: Online version: Silvicultural approaches to animal damage management in Pacific Northwest forests.

Portland, Or.: U.S. Dept. compendium will be titled A Silvicultural Approach to Managing Animal Damage in Pacific Northwest Forests and will be authored by experts in various aspects of an- imal damage management and silviculture.

It will provide a synthesis of publishedAuthor: D.M. Loucks, H.C. Black, M.L. Roush, S.R. Radosevich. Assessment and management of animal damage in Pacific Northwest forest: an annotated bibliography / technical coordinators, Donna M. Loucks [et al.]. Other Scholarly Content Images of Animal Damage Management in Pacific Northwest Forests Public Deposited.

Analytics × Add to This PowerPoint presentation contains selected images pertaining to Animal Damage Management in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States.

Viewers are welcome to use this PowerPoint or any images contained Author: John D. Walstad. This PowerPoint presentation contains selected images pertaining to Animal Damage Management in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States.

Viewers are welcome to use this PowerPoint or any images contained therein. The material has been assembled during much of the author’s career, so proper attribution would be appreciated when used. Pacific Northwest Weed Management Handbook – Online Version – see Forestry chapter. Rights-of-Way Vegetation Management – WSU Extension Publication MISC; Topic List.

Wetlands – see Riparian management. Wildlife – see also Animal damage, Birds and Bats, Endangered Species, and Riparian management. Bats Northwest. Pacific Northwest, specifically the western regions of Oregon, Washington, northern California, and British Columbia.

Mountain beavers are seldom seen, because of their subterranean lifestyle, but can cause considerable damage to forest regeneration.

They primarily cause damage by clipping seedlings and smallFile Size: KB. Silvicultural approaches to animal damage management in Pacific Northwest forests.

U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station, Portland, Or. Silviculture Systems and Stand Management. Chapter 6, p. In Hugh C. Black (ed.), Silviculture Approaches to Animal Damage Management in Pacific Northwest Forests. A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text.

The Northwest Forest Plan marked an important policy shift, but it did not end the struggles over the region's forests. Several Pacific Northwest runs of cutthroat trout and coho, sockeye, and chinook salmon were listed as endangered under the Endangered Species Act in Online Books by.

United States. Forest Service. Pacific Northwest Region. Books from the extended shelves: United States. Forest Service. Pacific Northwest Region: cooperative Douglas-fir tussock moth control project: Oregon, Washington, Idaho / (Portland, Oreg.

Wildlife in managed forests: An overview of perspectives from the Pacific Northwest. Forest Ecology and Management Taylor, J., and R. Singleton. Forest Ecology and Management, 61 () Elsevier Science Publishers B.V., Amsterdam Economic assessment of ungulate herbivory in commercial forests of eastern Oregon and Washington, USA James F.

Weigand*,a, Richard W. Haynesa, Arthur R. Tiedemannb, Robert A. Riggsc, Thomas M. Quigleyd aUSDA Pacific Northwest Research Station, P.O. BoxPortland, ORUSA bUSDA Pacific Cited by: 9. Identifying and managing mountain beaver damage to forest resources. Oregon State University Extension Service EM Taylor, J.D.

Wildlife in managed forests: An overview of perspectives from the Pacific Northwest. Forest Ecology and Management doi: / Black Bear Damage to Forest Trees in Northwest Oregon ii Acknowledgements: We gratefully acknowledge the numerous forest land owners who cooperated in the survey by providing funding through the Oregon Forest Industries Council Animal Damage Committee, by providing access to their lands, and by ground verifying many polygons.

A collection of 22 papers by 29 specialists on the use of prescribed burning for silvicultural purposes, primarily in Washington and Oregon. Topics covered include the role of fire in natural ecosystems, the use of prescribed fire in forest and rangeland, the effects of prescribed fire on wildfire, pests, diseases, forest productivity and non-timber resources, public attitudes and .Planting native oak in the Pacific Northwest.

Gen. Tech. Rep. PNW-GTR Portland, OR: U.S. Depart-ment of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station. 25 p. The extent of oak woodland and savanna habitat in the Pacific Northwest has been dramatically reduced since settlement in the mids. This report presents a prac-Cited by: 1.Forest Disease Management Notes Elytroderma Needle Blight Elytroderma needle blight of ponderosa pine is caused by the fungus Elytroderma deformans.

It is the most important foliage disease of ponderosa pine in the Pacific Northwest. Infection occurs at low levels in many stands, but usually only becomes damaging at elevations around 3, feet.